Blessed is the King who comes in the name of the Lord!

And when he had said these things, he went on ahead, going up to Jerusalem. When he drew near to Bethphage and Bethany, at the mount that is called Olivet, he sent two of the disciples, saying, “Go into the village in front of you, where on entering you will find a colt tied, on which no one has ever yet sat. Untie it and bring it here. If anyone asks you, ‘Why are you untying it?’ you shall say this: ‘The Lord has need of it.’ ” So those who were sent went away and found it just as he had told them. And as they were untying the colt, its owners said to them, “Why are you untying the colt?” And they said, “The Lord has need of it.” And they brought it to Jesus, and throwing their cloaks on the colt, they set Jesus on it. And as he rode along, they spread their cloaks on the road. As he was drawing near—already on the way down the Mount of Olives—the whole multitude of his disciples began to rejoice and praise God with a loud voice for all the mighty works that they had seen, saying, “Blessed is the King who comes in the name of the Lord! Peace in heaven and glory in the highest!” And some of the Pharisees in the crowd said to him, “Teacher, rebuke your disciples.” He answered, “I tell you, if these were silent, the very stones would cry out.” Luke 19 28-40

It is amazing how quickly the crowd turned against Jesus. This past Sunday, Palm Sunday, we celebrated Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem that is described by Luke in today’s verses. I am always amazed by the amount of detail Luke puts into his Gospel. He describes how Jesus instructs two of His disciples where to find the colt and what to say to the owner. Then we are shown a picture of Jesus riding the colt down from the Mount of Olives into Jerusalem. The crown gathers for Passover shouts out praises to Jesus, They shout, “Blessed is the King who comes in the name of the Lord! Peace in heaven and glory in the highest!” Of course the Pharisees want Jesus to rebuke the crowd.

Why rebuke the crowd? Because the Pharisees knew that what the crowd was actually proclaiming was the entry of the long promised messiah. A king who would sit on the throne of David forever. Rather than rebuke the crowd Jesus tells the Pharisees “I tell you, if these were silent, the very stones would cry out.” Nothing was going to stop the proclamation that the King had arrived in Jerusalem.

But four days later all this would change. Rather than cry out the coming of a king the crown would cry out crucify him. It took less than a week for the city to turn against Jesus. As we will see even His most trusted disciples would turn away from Him.

Have a blessed day,

David

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About dwwork

The name of this blog is taken from 1 Peter 3:13 - “always be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks you to give the reason for the hope that you have. But do this with gentleness and respect, keeping a clear conscience. This verse became special to me over ten years ago when I was asked to teach an adult Sunday school class on Christian apologetics. This interest grew over the years to the point that I took some graduate level classes in apologetics. I think the best way to be prepared to give and answer to everyone who asks is to know scripture. It is my hope that through these short devotionals the reader will become more familiar with each verse. I have tried when possible to make them personal hoping in some small way to show that God’s word written over two thousand years ago is still relevant today. In the writing of these short devotionals I have been able to better understand how God’s word impacts my life. It is my hope that you too will come closer to our Lord Jesus and develop a closer relationship with Him. Finally, if the reader finds anything in conflict with scripture please let me know. God’s word is the final authority always overrules anything I might write. David
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